Cabragh Wetlands Centre CLG

Room Booking

Cabragh, Thurles, Co. Tipperary, E41 T266   /    Office No: 0504 43879   /    Mon -Fri 10am – 3pm

Cabragh Wetlands

Education Centre

Cabragh Wetlands is the biggest single area of freshwater semi-natural floodplain habitats on the River Suir.

The wetlands comprise a mosaic of habitats, including reedbed, tall herb swamp, wet grassland, calcareous fen, transition mire, alluvial woodland, watercourse, lake, ponds and springs. 

Wetlands play a crucial role in conservation efforts, serving as habitats for diverse flora and fauna while also providing essential ecosystem services such as water filtration and flood control. They offer opportunities for recreation, allowing people to engage in activities like birdwatching, fishing, and hiking, fostering a connection with nature. Additionally, wetlands serve as outdoor classrooms, facilitating environmental education initiatives where individuals can learn about the importance of wetland ecosystems, biodiversity, and conservation practices to promote their preservation for future generations.

 

Conservation 

Wetlands are paramount for preserving biodiversity and maintaining ecosystem health. These unique habitats support a wide array of plant and animal species, many of which are rare or endangered. By protecting wetlands, we ensure the continued survival of these species and maintain the balance of the ecosystem. Conservation efforts may include habitat restoration, pollution mitigation, and legal protections to safeguard wetland areas from development and degradation.

Recreation 

Wetlands offers opportunities for people to enjoy nature and engage in outdoor activities. Birdwatching, hiking, and photography are just a few examples of recreational pursuits that can be enjoyed in wetland environments. These activities not only promote physical and mental well-being but also foster a deeper appreciation and understanding of wetland ecosystems. Responsible recreation practices are essential to minimize human impact and preserve the integrity of these sensitive environments.

Education 

Wetlands are crucial for raising awareness about their ecological importance and promoting conservation efforts. Wetlands serve as outdoor classrooms where individuals of all ages can learn about biodiversity, water conservation, ecosystem services, and the interconnectedness of living organisms. Environmental education programs, guided tours, and interpretive signage in wetland areas help educate the public about the value of these ecosystems and empower individuals to become stewards of wetland conservation.

About the Wetlands Habitat

It is numbered amongst the last Irish environmental treasures which, as yet, remains relatively free of interference by mankind, instead remaining supervised solely by Mother Nature. It is the home of the green-listed Grey Heron and feeding ground to the dwindling population of native Bumble Bees. Within its boundaries grow undisturbed, Bronze Fennel, Wavy Bitter-cress, Shepherds Purse, Golden-saxifrage, Common Mouse-ear, Barren Strawberry, and a huge variety of Wild Orchids. Here also one can view numerous varieties of Dragon Fly, the rarely viewed Hummingbird Hawk Moth, Froghopper’s Cuckoo Spit, Juda’s Ear and a huge variety of sedges, grasses and reeds.

It is a place frequented by walkers, photographers, lovers, artists, and sometimes those with heavy hearts. It is an amazing area for inquisitive children in search of knowledge, where Mother Nature hands to teachers a clean blank blackboard, with which to educate future generations.

I speak of course of Cabragh Wetlands.

A Selection of Photos

Below is a selection of photos which highlight some of the natural resources, facilities and activities of Cabragh Wetlands. Further down you will find information on a very small sample of the Wetland flora and fauna. Just put your cursor on a picture of the species that interests you and it will pivot to provide you with information about it.

Flora & Fauna

Grey Heron

Ardeidae

Grey Heron

Grey Herons are found in the same wetland habitats during the winter as in the breeding season. Birds breeding in Ireland are thought to be sedentary and birds from Britain and even Scandinavia join our resident population for the winter.

Bumblebees

Bombus

Bumblebees

Ireland has 21 species of bumblebees and they are our most abundant and widespread wild pollinator with 4 out of every 5 wild bees being a bumblebee. In 2013, a worldwide study shows that the decline of wild bees and other pollinators

Wavy Bittercress

Cardamine flexuosa

Wavy Bittercress

This is a little perennial or biennial plant which can be easily overlooked. In many ways it is very like its annual relative, Hairy Bitter-cress, but it can be distinguished by a few identifying factors;

Golden-saxifrage

Chrysosplenium

Golden-saxifrage

This flower is found throughout Ireland beside shady streams and in damp woodland and is a mat-forming perennial wildflower which forms a carpet of low-growing yellow-green vegetation.

Shepherds Purse

Capsella bursa-pastoris

Shepherds Purse

All-year round this little annual wildflower can be found growing in gardens, on tracks, cracks in pavements and on arable land. Its 4-petalled white flowers (2-3mm across) are borne in terminal clusters

Barren Strawberry

Potentilla sterilis

Barren Strawberry

This is a pretty little wildflower with five-petalled 10–15 mm white flowers and bluish green trefoil leaves. It grows by dry woodland and on grassy banks. This plant is quite similar to the Wild Strawberry

Wild Orchids

Dactylorhiza occidentalis

Wild Orchids

Ireland has 30 native species one of which, the Western Marsh Orchid, is unique to the island. … In areas where marsh and dry habitats occur close by you can observe a wide diversity of orchid species in close proximity.

Dragonflies

Anisoptera

Dragonflies

Dragonflies are probably the most deadly group of aerial Irish predators. Easily spotted chasing down quarry, these effervescent hunters sport some of the most colourful names too, reminiscent of dragons from Harry Potter.